Posted in Sarah's Attic Of Treasures

The New Basics Puttanesca By Alexandria Cooks With Sarah’s Definitions

The New Basics Puttanesca By Alexandria Cooks

http://www.alexandracooks.com/2015/12/09/the-new-basics-puttanesca/

From Sarah : I would have called this dish Spaghetti Alla Puttanesca.
Everyone knows what spaghetti is.

Puttanesca : Definition Of

Etymology[edit]

From Italian puttanesca(like a prostitute), from puttana(prostitute).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

puttanesca (usually uncountable, plural puttanescas)

  1. A cooking sauce made from tomato flavoured with garlic, anchovies, capers and olives

From Sarah : I can understand Number 1.

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

puttanesca

  1. of, or resembling a prostitute

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

 

Spaghetti alla Puttanesca
Found On Wikipedia :
Pasta_Puttanesca.jpg

Origin[edit]

Various accounts exist as to when and how the dish originated, but it likely dates to the mid-twentieth century. The earliest known mention of it is in Raffaele La Capria’s Ferito a Morte (Mortal Wound), a 1961 Italian novel which mentions “spaghetti alla puttanesca come li fanno a Siracusa (spaghetti alla puttanesca as they make it in Syracuse)”.[2] The sauce became popular in the 1960s, according to the Professional Union of Italian Pasta Makers.[3]

The 1971 edition of the Cucchiaio d’argento (The Silver Spoon), one of Italy’s most prominent cookbooks, has no recipe with this name, but two which are similar: The Neapolitan spaghetti alla partenopea, is made with anchovies and generous quantities of oregano; while spaghetti alla siciliana is distinguished by the addition of green peppers. Still again there is a Sicilian style popular around Palermo that includes olives, anchovies and raisins.[4]

In a 2005 article from Il Golfo—a daily newspaper serving the Italian islands of Ischia and Procida—Annarita Cuomo asserted that sugo alla puttanesca was invented in the 1950s by Sandro Petti, co-owner of Rancio Fellone, a famous Ischian restaurant and nightspot.[5] According to Cuomo, Petti’s moment of inspiration came when—near closing one evening—Petti found a group of customers sitting at one of his tables. He was low on ingredients and so told them he didn’t have enough to make them a meal. They complained that it was late and they were hungry. “Facci una puttanata qualsiasi,” or “Make any kind of garbage,” they insisted.a[›] Petti had nothing more than four tomatoes, two olives and some capers—the basic ingredients for the sugo, “So I used them to make the sauce for the spaghetti,” Petti told Cuomo. Later, Petti included this dish on his menu as spaghetti alla Puttanesca.
Wikipedia.

The New Basics Puttanesca :http://www.alexandracooks.com/2015/12/09/the-new-basics-puttanesca/
puttanesca11-1

Sometimes dinner needs to come from a box or a tin or a jar or, if you are making The New Basics pasta Puttanesca, all of the above.

A few weeks ago, my neighbor, the one who introduced me to The Moosewood tomato salsa, strolled by the house, casually noting she was making a big pot of Puttanesca, and wondered if we would like to join her. Well, as you can imagine, we did, and we gobbled up every olive, caper and strand of the spaghetti clinging to the pot.

From Sarah : I say YUMMY. Danny would agree, especially if I added another tin or 2  of anchovies . We love anchovies

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Author:

My real name is Debra (Debbie Sue). Sarah is a nickname given to me in high school. My husband has always called me that so here in Florida It's all I am known by. I was born and raised in Illinois. My son and I moved to Colorado in 1982. I taught school for 17 years. Then I ran a homeschooling/preschool/daycare until 2006 when I moved to Florida after my son, Bobby died suddenly. He was almost 26. Danny and I live and work at a state park here. I miss the mountains and climate of Colorado. I miss snow and the four seasons. I miss Bobby.

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