Amtrak 302 — and sure stars shining . . .

6.34 a.m. Friday, aboard Amtrak 302, Saint Louis to Chicago. We are at the Saint Louis station, about to depart. Walking into the intermodal transportation hub on 15th Street this morning, I was struck by the rare sight of an extended Amish family in very conservative attire: kapps and bonnets for the women, full black in […]

via Amtrak 302 — and sure stars shining . . .

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  1. They are Amish. A very strict religious group. I copied a definition for you.
    https://www.britannica.com/topic/AmishBeliefs And Way Of Life
    “Humility, family, community, and separation from the world are the mainstays of the Amish. Everyday life and custom are governed by an unwritten code of behaviour called the Ordnung, and shunning (Meidung) remains an integral way in which the community deals with disobedient members. In formal religious doctrine, the Amish differ little from the Mennonites. Holy Communion is celebrated twice each year, and foot washing is practiced by both groups. Persons are baptized when they are admitted to formal membership in the church, about the age of 17 to 20 years. Religious services are conducted in High German, and Pennsylvania Dutch (see Pennsylvania German)—an admixture of High German, various German dialects, and English—is spoken at home and is common in daily discourse. The services are held on a rotating basis in family homes and barns. A large wagon, filled with benches for the service and dishes and food for the meal that follows, will often be pulled to the host’s property. In most Amish homes a special place is reserved alongside the Bible for the Martyr’s Mirror, a book chronicling Amish history and honouring the many Amish, Mennonite, and Anabaptist forebears who died for their faith. The Budget, established in 1890, is the national newspaper serving the many Amish and Mennonite communities; it is published in Sugarcreek, Ohio.

    The Amish are best known for their plain clothing, most of it self-made, and nonconformist lifestyle. Men and boys wear broad-brimmed black hats, dark-coloured suits, straight-cut coats without lapels, broadfall pants, suspenders, solid-coloured shirts, and black socks and shoes. Their shirts may fasten with conventional buttons, but their coats and vests fasten with hooks and eyes. Men grow beards after they marry but are forbidden to have mustaches. Old Order Amish women and girls wear bonnets, long full dresses with capes over the shoulders, shawls, and black shoes and stockings; their capes and aprons are fastened with straight pins or snaps. Amish women never cut their hair, which is worn in a bun, and they are not allowed to wear jewelry of any kind. The Amish attire, which is essentially that of 17th-century European peasants, reflects their reluctance to change, their respect for tradition, and their interpretation of biblical strictures against conforming to the ways of the world (e.g., Romans 12:2).”

  2. Sohair says:

    I like the style of their hair cover..are they nunary girls??

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