November 1st: All Saints Day: The History And Traditions Behind The Holiday : Reposting

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https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/when-is-all-saints-day-2019-all-hallows-day-catholics-a4275401.html

When Is All Saints Day : What Is It And Who Celebrates It.

Now that spooky season is officially over and our Halloween costumes are packed away for another year, our thoughts may start to turn to Christmas.

But don’t be putting up the tinsel just yet, because directly after Halloween is the Christian holiday of All Saints’ Day.

While it may be easy to forget the religious origins of Halloween, November 1 marks a special holiday observed by Roman Catholics and most Protestant denominations worldwide.

All Saints’ Day is an opportunity for worshippers to remember saints and martyrs throughout Christian history.

So why do Christians celebrate All Saints’ Day – and what is it? Here’s everything you need to know.

A cross stands at the Chartreuse cemetery in central Bordeaux on October 26, 2018 ahead of All Saints’ Day. (AFP/Getty Images)

When is All Saints’ Day?

All Saints’ Day – also known as All Hallows’ Day or Hallowmas, is celebrated on November 1, the day after Halloween.

It comes just after the pagan holiday of Samhain and is directly followed by the Mexican Day of the Dead festival and another Christian holiday, All Souls’ Day.

In Eastern Orthodox and associated Eastern Catholic churches, All Saints’ Day is observed on the first Sunday following Pentecost.

Why do Christians celebrate it?

All Saints’ Day has been a Christian tradition since the 4th century AD, but it wasn’t until 609AD that Pope Boniface IV decided to remember all martyrs.

Originally the Feast of All Holy Martyrs, as it was then known, was celebrated on May 13.

Then in 837AD Pope Gregory IV extended the holy day to remember all saints, changed its name to the Feast of All Saints and changed the date to November 1.

It’s thought that the date was chosen to replace the end of harvest time and the Gaelic festival of Samhain, known as the festival of the dead.

In Catholic tradition, the holiday honours those who have passed on to the Kingdom of Heaven.

In Methodist tradition, it relates to giving God earnest gratitude for the lives and deaths of his saints.

Pope John Paul II stressed the importance of All Saints’ Day in 2003: “We celebrate today the solemnity of All Saints. This invites us to turn out gaze to the immense multitude of those who have already reached the blessed land, and points us on the path that will lead us to that destination.”

How is All Saints’ Day celebrated?

Catholics are expected to attend mass on All Saints’ Day, although Bishops in many countries don’t make this a requirement if the holiday does not fall on a Sunday.

There is usually a reading of the Beatitudes, the eight blessings recounted in Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount in the Gospel of Matthew.

Some also leave offerings of flowers to dead relatives and others may light candles and visit the graves of lost loved ones.

How does it relate to Halloween?

The Christian holiday of All Saints’ Day has close associations with Halloween (freestocks/Unsplash)

While nowadays we may associate Halloween with trick or treating and scary movies, Halloween started out as a holy Christian celebration.

‘Hallow’ in Old English means ‘holy’ or ‘sacred,’ so Hallows’ Eve or Halloween simply means “the evening of holy persons” and refers to the evening before All Saints’ Day.

Halloween is a mixture of Celtic religious ideas and Christian martyrology.”

https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/when-is-all-saints-day-2019-all-hallows-day-catholics-a4275401.html

https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/01/world/all-saints-day-trnd/index.html
All Saints Day – November 1st

All Saints Day: The history and traditions behind the holiday By CNN
“Every year on November 1, many Roman Catholics and other Christians around the world observe All Saints Day, which honors all saints of the church that have attained heaven. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, All Saints Day is observed on the first Sunday after Pentecost. Here’s a look at the history and traditions of this holy holiday. ”

“Where All Saints Day came from

Although now observed in November, All Saints Day was originally celebrated on May 13, although the origin cannot be traced with certainty, accoring to Encyclopedia Brittanica. Pope Boniface IV formally started what would later be known as All Saints Day on May 13 in 609 AD when he dedicated the Pantheon in Rome as a church in honor of the Virgin Mary and all martyrs.
The current date of November 1 was established by Pope Gregory III during his reign (731-741 AD) when he dedicated a chapel in Rome’s St. Peter’s Basilica in honor of all saints. While this celebration was originally limited to Rome, later in 837 Pope Gregory IV ordered the official observance of All Saints Day every November 1 and extended its celebration to the entire Church.

All Saints really means ALL saints

While many canonized saints are celebrated with their own individual day (such as St. Patrick), saints that have not been canonized have no particular holiday. All Saints Day recognizes those whose have attained heaven, but their sainthood is known only to God. Even so, Catholic observances tend to focus on known saints, those canonized by the Catholic Church.

A holy obligation

According to Catholic Online, within the Catholic Church, All Saints’ Day is generally considered a Holy Day of Obligation, meaning all Catholics must attend Mass unless they are prevented by illness or another sufficient excuse. After the Protestant Reformation, many Protestant sects kept All Saints Day. Methodists, for example, acknowledge it as a day of giving God earnest gratitude for the lives and deaths of saints, according to Christianity.com.

Observances around the world

Although not a public holiday in the US, All Saints’ Day is observed publicly in many countries. In France and Germany, people have the work day off and businesses are closed. In the Philippines, All Saints Day is known as “Undas” and isn’t just for remembering the saints, but for honoring and paying respects to departed loved ones, usually with prayers, flowers, and good offerings and graves.”

Reformation Day October 31- Martin Luther : Repost

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       What Is Reformation Day And When Is It.

Reformation Day is October 31.
Reformation Sunday is October 27, 2019.

What Is Reformation Day All About?

FROM Oct 29, 2014

“At the time, few would have suspected that the sound of a hammer striking the castle church door in Wittenberg, Germany, would soon be heard around the world and lead ultimately to the greatest transformation of Western society since the apostles first preached the Gospel throughout the Roman empire. Martin Luther’s nailing of his ninety-five theses to the church door on October 31, 1517, provoked a debate that culminated finally in what we now call the Protestant Reformation.”

“Martin Luther’s rediscovery of this truth led to a whole host of other church and societal reforms and much of what we take for granted in the West would have likely been impossible had he never graced the scene. Luther’s translation of the Bible into German put the Word of God in the hands of the people, and today Scripture is available in the vernacular language of many countries, enabling lay people to study it with profit. He reformed the Latin mass by putting the liturgy in the common tongue so that non-scholars could hear and understand the preached word of God and worship the Lord with clarity. Luther lifted the unbiblical ban on marriage for the clergy and by his own teaching and example radically transformed the institution itself. He recaptured the biblical view of the priesthood of all believers, showing all people that their work had purpose and dignity because in it they can serve their Creator.”

http://www.ligonier.org/blog/what-reformation-day-all-about/

A Mighty Fortress Is Our God
Written By Martin Luther:



https://songsandhymns.org/people/detail/martin-luther

Wikipedia

Reformation Day is a religious holiday celebrated on October 31, alongside All Hallows’ Eve, in remembrance of theReformation, particularly by Lutheran and some Reformed church communities. It is a civic holiday in the German states ofBrandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia as well as in Slovenia (since the Reformation contributed profoundly to that nation’s cultural development, although Slovenes are mainly Roman Catholics). It has also been a national holiday in Chile since 2009.[1]

In the United States churches often transfer the holiday, so that it falls on the Sunday (called Reformation Sunday) on or before October 31, with All Saints’ Day moved to the Sunday on or after November 1

Lutheran church

“I saw another angel fly in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach…”[11] This passage, traditionally interpreted as referring to Luther,[citation needed] is commonly the text preached on during Reformation Day services.

Within the Lutheran church, Reformation Day  is officially referred to as The Festival of the Reformation. Until the 20th century, most Lutheran churches celebrated Reformation Day on October 31, regardless of which day of the week it occurred. Today, most Lutheran churches transfer the festival, so that it falls on the Sunday (called Reformation Sunday) on or before October 31 and transfer All Saints’ Day to the Sunday on or after November 1.

The liturgical color of the day is red, which represents the Holy Spirit and the Martyrs of the Christian Church. Luther’s hymn, A Mighty Fortress is our God is traditionally sung on this day. It is also traditional in some Lutheran schools for schoolchildren to hold Reformation Day plays or pageants that re-enact scenes from the life of Martin Luther. The fact that Reformation Day coincides with Halloween is not mere coincidence. Halloween, being the Eve of All Saints’ Day might have been an entirely appropriate day for Luther to post his 95 Theses against indulgences since the castle church would be open on All Saints’ Day specifically for people to view a large collection of relics. The viewing of these relics was said to promise a reduction in time in purgatory similar to that of the purchase of an indulgence. That Martin Luther intended his 95 Theses to persuade the common people, however, is extremely unlikely, since the 95 Theses were written in Latin, a language which the common people did not understand.

http://www.missionstclare.com/english/people/oct31.html

REFORMATION DAY (from the Lutheran calendar)On the Eve of All Saints, Day, October 31, 1517, Augustinian Father
Doctor Martin Luther, professor of Scripture at the University of
Wittenberg, Germany posted an invitation to debate on the door of the
Wittenberg Cathedral. The invitation to debate contained ninety-five
points, or theses, concerning the sale of indulgences. Luther chose
this date for posting his theses because the coming holyday would bring
many of the community to services, ensuring that his statements would
receive wide exposure.”

Reformation Day is a religious holiday celebrated on October 31, alongside All Hallows’ Eve, in remembrance of the Reformation, particularly by Lutheran and some Reformed church communities.

Sunday, October 25, 2015

Churches Remembering Martin Luther With Reformation Sunday Observance
Read more at http://www.christianpost.com/news/churches-remembering-martin-luther-with-reformation-sunday-observance-107471/#zWatJq7cF8rhHF3O.99

BY MICHAEL GRYBOSKI, CHRISTIAN POST REPORTER
October 27, 2013|9:47 am

“Nearly five centuries ago in Central Europe, an unknown Augustinian monk decided to nail 95 theses to a church door, sparking a religious revolution felt to the present day.

Reformation Day, the anniversary of when Martin Luther began the Protestant Reformation, is an observance remembered by hundreds of American churches in the modern day.  While the exact date of Luther’s call to theological debate was Oct. 31, or the Eve of All Saints’ Day, many Protestant congregations choose to observe the occasion on the last Sunday in the month.”


Read more at http://www.christianpost.com/news/churches-remembering-martin-luther-with-reformation-sunday-observance-107471/#zWatJq7cF8rhHF3O.99

http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/Biographies/martin_luther.htm

I Am Thankful For : Day One

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Our Front Yard.
Cooler Temperatures.


I Am Thankful For : Day One.

This will be short. It’s been way too long since I have even written anything here. Too be honest, I can’t remember how to make these letters smaller.
LOL
Danny will be home soon and this needs to get posted before he gets home.
I will write more later.

It’s hard to do am I am Thankful post when the thing you ARE THANKFUL FOR CAUSED A HUGE FIGHT THIS MORNING.

I will expand later. ALL I can say now is :

I AM Thankful For : DAY ONE.

I am thankful for cooler weather.
First morning I didn’t wake up all sweaty.

It was 74 degrees in the house.


The BAD SIDE OF IT.
DANNY WAS COLD.

He BLEW UP because the fan in the kitchen was on when he turned on the light. Instead of turning it off or even asking me to :

HE BLEW UP.

STARTED YELLING AT ME. Wouldn’t stop.

Hard to be thankful when Danny is DRINKING A LOT. IT’S EFFECTING EVERYTHING.

I Had A Good Day VideoBy Sarah

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As you have noticed: I haven’t been around. At All. I never meant to leave when I did a couple of months ago.
I got really Sick again.
Another Covid relapse. They keep getting worse.

Beautiful Reds

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The cardinal has been all over our yard. So has his mate.

We have been enjoying the Cardinals once again

More to come.

Watch “BEEF COFFEE?” on YouTube

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It looks good and creamy. I don’t drink coffee but would like to try it in my Chai Tea Latte..

I admit though, beef anything in my Chai Tea Latte sounds horrible. Yet, I never, ever, thought I would add milk or cream to my herbal teas. Now I love them.

Watch “Remember When 🇺🇸 (sentiments at the end)” on YouTube

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God Bless America.

Bring back family dinners.

We want the Good Ol Days back.

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