Posted in Sarah's Attic Of Treasures

Do You Remember May Basket Day? – Spring Traditions

http://www.countryliving.com/life/news/a35407/do-you-remember-may-basket-day/

Country Living : Do You Remember May Basket Day?

Back in simpler times, people rang in the first of May with a particularly charming and elegant tradition: According to a report by NPR, they would take all the flowers that they had gathered at the end of April’s showers, arrange them in pretty paper along with some gifts and candies, and then hang them on the doors of friends and neighbors as a way of welcoming them into warmer weather.

Of course, it was also a way of letting a romantic prospect know that you cared for her, as boys would often hang baskets on the doorknobs of the ladies they fancied. 

Posted in Sarah's Attic Of Treasures

May Baskets Craft Idea

http://www.theideabox.com/May_Baskets.html

Use brightly colored construction paper to make baskets by cutting the paper into triangle shapes. Roll the triangles into cone shaped baskets and glue or tape together, finish by adding a strip of construction paper to make a handle. Fill the basket with left over Easter grass, then add fresh flowers the children pick (even dandelions will do) or if you live in a cold climate, with no fresh flowers yet, cut pictures of flowers from magazines or gardening catalogs and glue them to toothpicks and arrange in the basket. Then have the child choose an elderly friend or relative to give their basket to.  

Posted in Sarah's Attic Of Treasures

Victorian May Day Baskets

http://oldfashionedliving.com/Victorian-May-Day-Baskets.html

May baskets evolved from an old tradition that involves gathering fresh flowers or placing small candies inside of a handmade basket. That basket is then hung on a neighbor’s door knob or left on the door step for its recipient to discover. The history of course, goes far deeper than that, but today we are talking baskets. One variation says that baskets were left on doorsteps, the door bell rang and the giver would run away. If the receiver could catch the giver, a kiss was to be exchanged.