Posted in Sarah's Attic Of Treasures

President Wilson proclaims Mother’s Day, May 9, 1914 – POLITICO

http://www.politico.com/story/2017/05/09/president-wilson-proclaims-mothers-day-may-9-1914-237990

Before Mother’s Day became an official holiday, Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910), a social activist and the author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” called on women to create such a holiday. In 1870, during the aftermath of the Civil War, Howe wrote a Mother’s Day proclamation as a call for peace. It began, “From the voice of a devastated Earth a voice goes up with our own. It says: ‘Disarm! Disarm!’” 

Please read the rest of the story. 

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Mother’s Day – Holidays – HISTORY.com

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/mothers-day 

The History Of Mother’s  Day

Mother’s Day is a holiday honoring motherhood that is observed in different forms throughout the world. The American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. Jarvis would later denounce the holiday’s commercialization and spent the latter part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar. While dates and celebrations vary, Mother’s Day most commonly falls on the second Sunday in May and traditionally involves presenting mothers with flowers, cards and other gifts.

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Mother’s Day – Wikipedia

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother%27s_Day

Mother’s Day : Wikipedia 

Mother’s Day is a celebration honoring the mother of the family, as well as motherhood, maternal bonds, and the influence of mothers in society. It is celebrated on various days in many parts of the world, most commonly in the months of March or May. It complements similar celebrations honoring family members, such as Father’s DaySiblings Day, andGrandparents Day.

In the United States, celebration of Mother’s Day began in the early 20th century. It is not related to the many celebrations of mothers and motherhood that have occurred throughout the world over thousands of years, such as the Greek cult to Cybele, the Roman festival of Hilaria, or the Christian Mothering Sunday celebration (originally a commemoration of Mother Church, not motherhood).[1][2][3][4]However, in some countries, Mother’s Day has become synonymous with these older traditions.[5]

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When Mother’s Day Hurts – (in)courage

http://www.incourage.me/2017/05/mothers-day-hurts 

(In) Courage :When Mother’s  Day Hurts.

As I sat in the pew, the pastor preached a stirring sermon on the attributes of motherhood. All the things he said were true. They just didn’t apply to me. And when the time came for all the mothers in the sanctuary to stand and be honored, my head dipped and the tears flowed. As mothers all around the room proudly rose from their seats, I prayed silently.

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Cinco de Mayo – Wikipedia

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinco_de_Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (pronounced: [ˈsiŋko ðe ˈmaʝo]Spanish for “Fifth of May”) is a celebration held on May 5. The date is observed to commemorate the Mexican Army‘s unlikely victory over French forces at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862, under the leadership of General Ignacio Zaragoza.[1][2]

In the United States, Cinco de Mayo has taken on a significance beyond that in Mexico.[3][4][5][6] In the U.S. the date has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades.

In the United States, Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken to be Mexico’s Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores that initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain.[1][7] 

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Do You Remember May Basket Day? – Spring Traditions

http://www.countryliving.com/life/news/a35407/do-you-remember-may-basket-day/

Country Living : Do You Remember May Basket Day?

Back in simpler times, people rang in the first of May with a particularly charming and elegant tradition: According to a report by NPR, they would take all the flowers that they had gathered at the end of April’s showers, arrange them in pretty paper along with some gifts and candies, and then hang them on the doors of friends and neighbors as a way of welcoming them into warmer weather.

Of course, it was also a way of letting a romantic prospect know that you cared for her, as boys would often hang baskets on the doorknobs of the ladies they fancied. 

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History of May Day

http://www.theholidayspot.com/mayday/history.htm

Well, it is a fact that May Day, which the children do enjoy with all vibes, is not an overly prominent holiday in America. Yet, it does have a long and notable history as one of the world’s principal festivals. The origin of the May Day as a day for celebration dates back to the days, even before the birth of Christ. And like many ancient festivals it too has a Pagan connection.


Read more at http://www.theholidayspot.com/mayday/history.htm#EQrMqmYmGQ8jpKSp.99

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May Baskets Craft Idea

http://www.theideabox.com/May_Baskets.html

Use brightly colored construction paper to make baskets by cutting the paper into triangle shapes. Roll the triangles into cone shaped baskets and glue or tape together, finish by adding a strip of construction paper to make a handle. Fill the basket with left over Easter grass, then add fresh flowers the children pick (even dandelions will do) or if you live in a cold climate, with no fresh flowers yet, cut pictures of flowers from magazines or gardening catalogs and glue them to toothpicks and arrange in the basket. Then have the child choose an elderly friend or relative to give their basket to.  

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Victorian May Day Baskets

http://oldfashionedliving.com/Victorian-May-Day-Baskets.html

May baskets evolved from an old tradition that involves gathering fresh flowers or placing small candies inside of a handmade basket. That basket is then hung on a neighbor’s door knob or left on the door step for its recipient to discover. The history of course, goes far deeper than that, but today we are talking baskets. One variation says that baskets were left on doorsteps, the door bell rang and the giver would run away. If the receiver could catch the giver, a kiss was to be exchanged.  

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Family Favorite Easter Crockpot Recipes – Family Fresh Meals

http://www.familyfreshmeals.com/2017/04/family-favorite-easter-crockpot-recipes.html

When it comes to Easter dinner, I like to keep things traditional. We enjoy a nice ham every year and tons of different sides. I always make sure we have plenty of veggies and of course hot cross buns. We also go all out when it comes to Easter dessert, because after all the best part of dinner with family is the pie.

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Mediterranean-Style Wine Braised Lamb Shanks with Vegetables | The Mediterranean Dish

https://www.themediterraneandish.com/braised-lamb-shanks-vegetables/

From Sarah : Another one of those days. Nothing is working well. I gave been trying to add a quote here for 30 minutes. 

Nothing works. 

The photo won’t load here but it should load on the feature pic. 

This recipe looks and sounds amazing.

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Food, Recipes, Menus, Kosher, Kosher food, Kosher recipes, Kosher food Boston, Kosher food New England, Kosher food MA

http://shalomboston.com/Default.aspx?tabid=83&agentType=ViewSearch&CustomFieldIDs=19&SearchValues=Passover&language=en-US

Passover Recipes From Shalom Boston. 

From Sarah : I just discovered this blog. I haven’t had a chance to look it over yet.