Food: One of the Most Unifying Tools in the Hands of Homemaker By Journeys Of A Homemaker

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Food: One of the Most Unifying Tools in the Hands of Homemaker

Food: One of the Most Unifying Tools in the Hands of Homemaker

Every family has their own food culture. Favorite recipes and traditions passed down through generations, foods from an ethnic heritage, as well as lifestyle foods based on health, convenience, and economics all make up the circumference of foods a family regularly enjoys. Certain foods in each family are also traditional for certain holidays, and occasions.

 

Celebrating Advent: Keeping Jesus Christ The Focus Of The Season

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Celebrating Advent: Keeping Jesus Christ The Focus Of The Season

By Deseret News  Nov 25, 2011, Eric D. Huntsman, For the Deseret News


https://www.deseret.com/2011/11/25/20389990/celebrating-advent-keeping-jesus-christ-the-focus-of-the-season


“Advent is an important tradition in Germany and Scandinavia as well as being part of the Christmas worship of many branches of Christianity, including the Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican and Methodist churches. The name “Advent” comes from the Latin ‘adventus,’ meaning “coming, appearance, or presence.”

As early as Pope Gregory the Great (A.D. 590–604), Advent was established as a four-week preparatory period that anticipated the celebration of the birth, or advent, of Jesus Christ as the Babe of Bethlehem. But as observed today, Advent also celebrates Christ’s presence and importance in our lives now, and, just as importantly, looks forward to his future return in glory when he will reign as Lord of Lords and King of Kings.

Although some Christian communities celebrate it differently, a common feature of the Advent celebration is the Advent wreath, a simple or decorated evergreen wreath with four candles set in the circle and perhaps a fifth, white candle set in the middle.”


The first Sunday of Advent: Hope

The second Sunday of Advent: Love

The third Sunday of Advent: Joy

Daily Christmas devotionals about Jesus Christ

Eric D. Huntsman is an associate professor of ancient scripture at Brigham Young University and is the author of “Good Tidings of Great Joy: An Advent Celebration of the Savior’s Birth” published by Deseret Book

Coping with Christmas Changes — Anne Rulo

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Christmas is a holiday marketed and built on tradition, expectations, and memories. And, as we tend to find comfort in the predictable, that can make it especially hard to adjust when Christmas changes. Shifting family dynamics, the arrival of new life and passing of others, weather, work, and travel challenges are just some of the […]

Coping with Christmas Changes — Anne Rulo

From Sarah :
The following is from the post.
“It turns out Christmas, like life, was never designed to remain the same year in and year out. God’s Word tells us that everything goes through seasons, so it makes sense that we should expect the same for Christmas. To that end, let us breathe in these words from the wisest man who ever lived. It’s amazing what a reminder about the inevitability of change may do to calm our holiday hearts…”

“There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens:
a time to be born and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot,
a time to kill and a time to heal,
a time to tear down and a time to build,
a time to weep and a time to laugh,
a time to mourn and a time to dance,
a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them,
a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,
a time to search and a time to give up,
a time to keep and a time to throw away,
a time to tear and a time to mend,
a time to be silent and a time to speak,
a time to love and a time to hate,
a time for war and a time for peace.” (Ecclesiastes 3:1-8, NIV)”

From Sarah :
I have been in a SEASON OF ANGUISH And Hopelessness for a full year now. I remember the exact day I first realized how bad it was.
More to come.

Ten Hallmark Movies We’re Watching To Celebrate The Season By Due South

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Ten Hallmark Movies We’re Watching To Celebrate The Season
https://duesouth.media/ten-hallmark-movies-were-watching-to-celebrate-the-season/

“When the temperatures begin to dip, the leaves change colors and pumpkin spice abounds, you know Hallmark Channel’s seasonal programming to celebrate the fall, Halloween and Christmas can’t be far behind. We love the Hallmark Channel’s family-friendly programming that centers around love, community, seasonal gatherings, holiday traditions and everything cozy!

The south has always celebrated family and traditions, and to that end, we’ve compiled a list of our favorite Hallmark movies airing in the 2019 holiday season with a southern connection. Whether the lead actor has roots in the south or the movie is set in a southern city, we’re sharing the ten Hallmark Channel movies we’re watching this season to get us in the mood for pumpkin patches, trick or treating… and of course, Christmas.”

From Sarah :
This post was written in October so Halloween is still being celebrated.

Celebrating Thanksgiving Abroad – Travel’s Influence on Our Traditions — BIG tiny World Travel

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Contrary to popular belief, Thanksgiving isn’t just celebrated by Americans! Most commonly taking form as a harvest festival, thanks are given this time of year all around the world! Click to read more!

Celebrating Thanksgiving Abroad – Travel’s Influence on Our Traditions — BIG tiny World Travel

November 1st: All Saints Day: The History And Traditions Behind The Holiday

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https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/when-is-all-saints-day-2019-all-hallows-day-catholics-a4275401.html

When Is All Saints Day : What Is It And Who Celebrates It.

Now that spooky season is officially over and our Halloween costumes are packed away for another year, our thoughts may start to turn to Christmas.

But don’t be putting up the tinsel just yet, because directly after Halloween is the Christian holiday of All Saints’ Day.

While it may be easy to forget the religious origins of Halloween, November 1 marks a special holiday observed by Roman Catholics and most Protestant denominations worldwide.

All Saints’ Day is an opportunity for worshippers to remember saints and martyrs throughout Christian history.

So why do Christians celebrate All Saints’ Day – and what is it? Here’s everything you need to know.

A cross stands at the Chartreuse cemetery in central Bordeaux on October 26, 2018 ahead of All Saints’ Day. (AFP/Getty Images)

When is All Saints’ Day?

All Saints’ Day – also known as All Hallows’ Day or Hallowmas, is celebrated on November 1, the day after Halloween.

It comes just after the pagan holiday of Samhain and is directly followed by the Mexican Day of the Dead festival and another Christian holiday, All Souls’ Day.

In Eastern Orthodox and associated Eastern Catholic churches, All Saints’ Day is observed on the first Sunday following Pentecost.

Why do Christians celebrate it?

All Saints’ Day has been a Christian tradition since the 4th century AD, but it wasn’t until 609AD that Pope Boniface IV decided to remember all martyrs.

Originally the Feast of All Holy Martyrs, as it was then known, was celebrated on May 13.

Then in 837AD Pope Gregory IV extended the holy day to remember all saints, changed its name to the Feast of All Saints and changed the date to November 1.

It’s thought that the date was chosen to replace the end of harvest time and the Gaelic festival of Samhain, known as the festival of the dead.

In Catholic tradition, the holiday honours those who have passed on to the Kingdom of Heaven.

In Methodist tradition, it relates to giving God earnest gratitude for the lives and deaths of his saints.

Pope John Paul II stressed the importance of All Saints’ Day in 2003: “We celebrate today the solemnity of All Saints. This invites us to turn out gaze to the immense multitude of those who have already reached the blessed land, and points us on the path that will lead us to that destination.”

How is All Saints’ Day celebrated?

Catholics are expected to attend mass on All Saints’ Day, although Bishops in many countries don’t make this a requirement if the holiday does not fall on a Sunday.

There is usually a reading of the Beatitudes, the eight blessings recounted in Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount in the Gospel of Matthew.

Some also leave offerings of flowers to dead relatives and others may light candles and visit the graves of lost loved ones.

How does it relate to Halloween?

The Christian holiday of All Saints’ Day has close associations with Halloween (freestocks/Unsplash)

While nowadays we may associate Halloween with trick or treating and scary movies, Halloween started out as a holy Christian celebration.

‘Hallow’ in Old English means ‘holy’ or ‘sacred,’ so Hallows’ Eve or Halloween simply means “the evening of holy persons” and refers to the evening before All Saints’ Day.

Halloween is a mixture of Celtic religious ideas and Christian martyrology.”

https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/when-is-all-saints-day-2019-all-hallows-day-catholics-a4275401.html

https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/01/world/all-saints-day-trnd/index.html
All Saints Day – November 1st

All Saints Day: The history and traditions behind the holiday By CNN
“Every year on November 1, many Roman Catholics and other Christians around the world observe All Saints Day, which honors all saints of the church that have attained heaven. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, All Saints Day is observed on the first Sunday after Pentecost. Here’s a look at the history and traditions of this holy holiday. “

“Where All Saints Day came from

Although now observed in November, All Saints Day was originally celebrated on May 13, although the origin cannot be traced with certainty, accoring to Encyclopedia Brittanica. Pope Boniface IV formally started what would later be known as All Saints Day on May 13 in 609 AD when he dedicated the Pantheon in Rome as a church in honor of the Virgin Mary and all martyrs.
The current date of November 1 was established by Pope Gregory III during his reign (731-741 AD) when he dedicated a chapel in Rome’s St. Peter’s Basilica in honor of all saints. While this celebration was originally limited to Rome, later in 837 Pope Gregory IV ordered the official observance of All Saints Day every November 1 and extended its celebration to the entire Church.

All Saints really means ALL saints

While many canonized saints are celebrated with their own individual day (such as St. Patrick), saints that have not been canonized have no particular holiday. All Saints Day recognizes those whose have attained heaven, but their sainthood is known only to God. Even so, Catholic observances tend to focus on known saints, those canonized by the Catholic Church.

A holy obligation

According to Catholic Online, within the Catholic Church, All Saints’ Day is generally considered a Holy Day of Obligation, meaning all Catholics must attend Mass unless they are prevented by illness or another sufficient excuse. After the Protestant Reformation, many Protestant sects kept All Saints Day. Methodists, for example, acknowledge it as a day of giving God earnest gratitude for the lives and deaths of saints, according to Christianity.com.

Observances around the world

Although not a public holiday in the US, All Saints’ Day is observed publicly in many countries. In France and Germany, people have the work day off and businesses are closed. In the Philippines, All Saints Day is known as “Undas” and isn’t just for remembering the saints, but for honoring and paying respects to departed loved ones, usually with prayers, flowers, and good offerings and graves.”

Celebrate history with May Day basket tradition – Edina Historical Society

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http://www.edinahistoricalsociety.org/blog/celebrate-history-with-may-day-basket-tradition

Edina Historical Society: Celebrate History With May Day Traditions 

Children give to grownups, instead of the other way around. On almost every other holiday,only the child receives gifts; they don’t get to experience the true joy of unselfish giving.  My kids love giving the baskets to the neighbors as much as they enjoy getting candy from them on Halloween. The big part of the excitement has been trying to sneak around undetected. 

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